Monday, May 21, 2012

Dark chocolate books

When I was growing up, anytime I encountered anything chocolate, it was usually milk chocolate. And while I would eat milk chocolate, it was sweeter than I preferred. What I really liked was dark chocolate, with its bitter edge.

Not everyone likes a bitter edge. In fact, one of the surprises of my adult life has been the new popularity of dark chocolate. I'm enjoying that, because it means more dark chocolate is now available more places than ever before. Maybe it will be a fad, and in a couple of years everyone will go back to milk chocolate. Well--almost everyone, because I'll stick with the dark.

When I mention that "bitter edge," it makes me think of my taste in fiction, also. Contemporary realism is like dark chocolate in that way. Often, these are the books that cover darker topics. Some people find them too bitter, but many people find just what they need: a depth and richness that is satisfying in its bittersweetness.

6 comments:

  1. Great analogy. Too me it could also be books that you savor, because a dark chocolate bar (may I recommend Lindt Dark with Sea Salt) disappears a bit more slowly than a milk chocolate bar.

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  2. I adore dark chocolate, always have (especially good European dark chocolate), and I'm like you with fiction, as well. Most of the fiction I write has a dark edge, and I've noticed it's either received with great fanfare or people just hate it. I think that's why I love your books so much - they are fine-tuned for my tastes. ADORE. :)

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    1. Thank you. :-)
      I suppose it's not surprising that we like to write what we love to read!

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  3. I love dark chocolate. The analogy is so appropriate and not to mention yummy. I can identify with this because I tend to be attracted to stories that have rather dark undertones.

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    1. It seems counterintuitive, but people are often drawn toward the darkness, the bitter edge.

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